Top 5 (adaptations you liked better than the book) Tuesday

Look, I’ll be the brave soul to admit it – I do sometimes prefer the adaptations to the book! Maybe soon I’ll write a post about all the adaptations I’ve watched without (scandalous, I know!) reading the book or the series in full. And I don’t mind, because what will people do? Take my library card away? Hah!

If you wanna see more book and bookish related posts, head on over to Meeghan @ Meeghan Reads so you can see which adaptations she thinks are better than the books. Because I promise you, there are!

A Game of Thrones by George R. R, Martin – Yes, I’ve only read the first book but I’m confident enough to say I prefer the adaptation! I did really like the book, huge-o fan of thick epic fantasies but the tv series… is finishedπŸ˜‚ and the books aren’t! A lot of the fans complain about the ending of the last season and while there are some things I would change, it was actually a good last season (unlike True Blood’s last season πŸ˜’). I also like how the show ages characters up and how the battles are much more fun in the show!

The Awakening by L.J. Smith – Better known as The Vampire Diaries, I think I read the first book after having watched the first season (of the tv series) and it was just awful. All the characters were horridly different, their personalities tossed around and it was just really bad. I only got to around maybe S5? of The Vampire Diaries before forgetting to carry on and now I’m rewatching the earlier seasons and will actually finish up!! I promise! But seriously, it’s so bad.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily Danforth – I slugged through this book. It was a very slow read and I didn’t really enjoy it as much as I thought I would – and then I watched the movie and realised it was the case. I much prefer the movie to the book. It isn’t as slow as the book, doesn’t lag in places like I felt so often with the book. So, if you’re struggling with the book, try picking up the movie!

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald – I really love this book. It’s one of my favourite classics! But… I actually love the 2013 adaptation more than the classic book. Yes, the Baz Lurhman one – I love Moulin Rouge a lot πŸ˜„ But I really love how Lurhman revamped it and made it fun because sometimes classics are super boring! And also there’s a LOT of smybolism in Lurhman’s Great Gatsby.

Gossip Girl by Cecily von Ziegesar – The tv series is way more the better of the two. The books read like boring articles while the tv series are just fun and scandalous – even with the old phones and weird clothing styles I never understand because I guess that’s ‘fashion’? But anyway, I can’t WAIT for the reboot!

The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman – Okay, so don’t hate me, but I really loved the movie AND the series and prefer them over the book. I’m sorry, I just have to say it! The book is boringπŸ€·πŸ»β€β™€οΈ Maybe next time I’ll try it in audio? I did really like the movie and I’m currently LOVING the tv series! We just met Lee Scoresby and Iorek Byrnison (loved him in the original).

πŸ“šπŸš€πŸ“š

It’s okay to admit adaptations are better than the source material sometimes! If you don’t want to say that adaptations can’t be better than their book, comment a πŸ¦– and which adaptations are better than their books in the comments and I will yell your opinion loudly FOR YOU – don’t worry, my normal speaking volume is basically All Caps πŸ˜‚

12 thoughts on “Top 5 (adaptations you liked better than the book) Tuesday”

  1. I WANT YOU TO WRITE THE POST ABOUT ADAPTATIONS YOU’VE WATCHED WITHOUT THE SOURCE MATERIAL!

    Honestly I’ve watched so many shows without knowing they were book adaptations lol. The Witches of East End is one I recently picked up from my library and the writing was HORRIBLE but the show is so good lol. Fun post!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. πŸ‘€πŸ‘€ Kal, now you’ve given me an idea for TWO posts on this!! a lot of the time I’ll just watch a n adaptation knowing it was a book but chose not to get to it first (usually because I didn’t have ACCESS to the books – which i think will definitely be a good addition to the post (Talking about how it is a privilege to be able to read the book before the adaptation and how we shouldn’t shame people!)

      I think I know how the poster (I nearly said cover πŸ˜‚) of that series looks but I also might be confusing it with the new Charmed series.

      Thank you!

      Like

  2. It is very surprising for me to see that you liked Baz Luhrmann’s The Great Gatsby more than book because I gather the general impression was the exact opposite, but I support your opinion because I thought The Great Gatsby was not at all as bad as critics thought it was. They thought that, I quote, the book was “bastardised, becoming a flashy, CGI blockbuster.” Revamping classics should not be a taboo or shunned. Luhrmann made the story his own and he made it fun, as you say! Btw, can you tell me what symbolism you found in the film?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yeah, a lot of people don’t like the movie! But I’m weird like that πŸ˜… Honestly, I loved that they turned a classic into something so over the top. A lot of the times classic movie adaptations are so boring and stuffy to me and I find I enjoy loose adaptations more or adaptations like Lurhmann’s – see Romeo and Juliet for that – another amazing adaptation.

      The symbolism is more of the same in the book. The green light and Gatsby’s hand reaching out – out to Daisy and also the green light. The green light representing money, perhaps. The ever-watching eye of Dr. T.J. Eckleberg (I think that’s the correct spelling), watching the characters, much like the eyes of God. The shirt scene – where Gatsby throws all his shirts out of his closet to show Daisy -that’s at least half a page of symbolism right there.

      Sorry, I covered Gatsby in high school and university and I just really love it πŸ˜ƒ

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for this great reply! Definitely, some of these symbolic elements were in the book too. It’s great to find a person who loves the book so much and I wish I studied The Great Gatsby in school or academically too, but I am not from the US and I guess I had other course books! What I also find fascinating is how many stories and films then “borrowed” the concept of The Great Gatsby – what comes to mind are Spanish social-realist film Death of a Cyclist (1955), which relies on the same idea, and of course Tom Wolfe novel’s The Bonfire of the Vanities. Incidentally, I’ve recently read Willa Cather’s novel A Lost Lady and some academic sources cite this book as the greatest inspiration upon Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby. I certainly saw some evident thematic and character similarities.

        Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s